Tag: spirituality

You Don’t Know.

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As a young person, you’re constantly thinking about the future and what the future holds for you. At least that’s how I am. I find that I am always thinking about the future and wishing it could be now. I get impatient with waiting for the future and even when I don’t have those impatient moments, I can’t help but want those future events that I have in mind to just happen already.

See, as humans, we do not like waiting. Do we? Especially nowadays. We are seriously spoiled when it comes to the toys and gadgets we have today. We can get any information in an instant with our phones, tablets, laptops, and computers. If we are hungry and want food quickly, we have fast food (which I wouldn’t recommend, unless it’s Dell Taco). Literally, almost everything is available to us in an instant, except one thing. Time.

Lately, I have made a decision to just let those thoughts go and not worry about the future, but live fully in the present. As I made this decision I am reminded of an experience I had a couple of years ago, when my wife and I were able to sit down with President Henry B. Eyring, the first counselor in the Presidency of The LDS Church.
As we met with him, he leaned forward on his desk, looked me in eyes and asked,

“Ben, tell me your life story?”

I started to tell him about my schooling and what I was majoring in. My background on who I was, what I did and what my future plans were. Upon finishing he smiled with this really big smiled and chuckled and said

“You don’t know what you’re going to do. You don’t know.”

I was shocked by that comment and thought, excuse me? For real? You’re going to tell me, that I don’t know? I was so confused. He followed by saying, “No one knows what they’re going to do with their life. You just don’t know what will happen, where life will take you and what will come up in your life.” He then mentioned, how important it is to stay patient and pay close attention to the opportunities that arise.

I get so lost in the thought of the future and I think that we all do it. We tend to worry and at times it can affect our daily life and our current responsibilities. I have come to discover through President Eyring that it is not for us to worry about what is going to happen.

Life has seasons. I’m not talking about the four weather seasons. I’m talking about where we are in life. You may be in a new career season. Or a loss of a job season and you’re looking for work. A starting a family season. A newly wed season. Or like me, I am in the family season and finishing up my degree season. We can’t worry about the next season or what is next in our life. Focus on the now, live in the now! It’s okay to have future plans and goals but don’t let those future plans and goals overshadow or take away from our current responsibilities.

“To everything, there is a season and a time to every purpose…” -Ecclesiastes 3:1.

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We have no clue on what the future holds. We don’t know. I don’t know. You don’t know. Sure we may have future goals and ideas, but those can change. We have to keep our eyes and heart open to the opportunities that come our way. Too often people miss opportunities that come because we get so caught up on focusing on a sole plan that we end up missing things. I think that one of the definitions of success is the ability to make difficult choices and act on the unknown. I️ firmly believe that life is always throwing opportunities our way, sometimes we miss them, or we don’t seem to believe that it is an opportunity, or we are just flat out afraid to do anything about it. Do not fear or be hesitant about new opportunities. The future is only going to be as bright as your faith. Trust in time and simply just believe that if you stay the course and are willing to be patient, you will be led to know what you are to do.

So, quit worrying about the future, because it is out of your control. Live in the now and try to find joy in this journey that we call life.

“Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.” – John Wooden